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WOODSTOCK

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Studying trout

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Sophomore shines in track & field

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Elizabeth (Bloxsom) Nagle

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Abbie Darling Paterson

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Sea Shepherd comes to Woodstock

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NWPL Ex Libris Gala

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Communicating with animals

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Lillian (Wark) Wuttke DeGiacomo

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Carla Lamberton Hodgdon

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Woodstock softball beats Randolph

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News

Studying trout

The Prosper Valley School’s 4th and 5th graders have spent a lot of time hanging out with fish this school year, but, instead of mere relaxation, this is about serious science. The centerpiece of this new program is their own school of trout, also known as a hover, but there are several facets to it that have taught the students different aspects about the fish and our environment.

The program started along with the school year when the kids went snorkeling in the White River while the water was still warm. They were searching for various types of water bugs, better known to science as macroinvertebrates. Some of the bugs are sensitive to pollution while others are more resistant, thus making them useful indicators of water quality; the most hardy forms include leeches since they can live in poor quality water, while more sensitive types are mayflies and caddisflies, and among the most sensitive are stoneflies. In their observations, students not only found plenty of bugs, they also saw some species of fish they did not anticipate.

To read more, check out the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Sophomore shines in track & field

Woodstock

Faye Stevens is only a sophomore, but the Woodstock Union High School track and field star is primed for another successful season, according to her coaches.

Last year, Stevens was one of the Wasps’ top athletes on the girls’ team. At last year’s Division III state championships, she placed in the top 15 in several events including an impressive 16th place finish in the state championship decathlon … as a freshman.

Stevens competes in five events during the track and field season — the 100-meter hurdles, 400 meters, long jump, triple jump and her favorite event, the pole vault. Although WUHS does not have a track, Stevens travels to Windsor High School and practices at its pole vault pit.

For more on track and field star Faye Stevens, read the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Sea Shepherd comes to Woodstock

Woodstock

An internationally renowned environmental organization is opening a new headquarters in Woodstock Village.

The Sea Shepherd is an international direct-action ocean conservation movement whose mission is to protect marine wildlife and to end the destruction of habitat in the world’s oceans. Last Wednesday, Sea Shepherd staff along with Sea Shepherd founder, Paul Watson, were on-hand at their new location on Central Street.

Watson et al met with local residents and area business owners at a special event at Mon Vert Café.

Watson said the new office in Woodstock will be used for media production and archiving purposes. The Sea Shepherd will open for business as soon as Watson receives his permits from the town.

Watson opened the new office in the village because he is a Woodstock resident. His children also attend Woodstock schools.

“I’ve been living here since 2012,” Watson said, “One of our board of directors, Pritam Singh, also lives in Woodstock, and one of our captains, Rick Walker, is from Woodstock as well.”

To learn more about the Sea Shepherd organization, check out the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Communicating with animals

On Saturday, Jeannie Lindheim, a professional animal communicator, taught techniques for approximately two dozen pet owners to communicate with animal companions during a seminar at the Lucy Mackenzie Human Society in West Windsor.

“Breathing is everything. You want to do slow, deep breathing,” Lindheim said. “The key is peace, patience and persistance. Visualize what you want them to do.”

The seminar ended with a Q&A session where Lindheim answered participants questions about behaviors of their pets and how to apply the techniques taught to their pets.

Read more in the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Woodstock softball beats Randolph

Woodstock

The Woodstock girls’ softball team won their first game of the season on Monday. The Wasps held off Randolph by a score of 8-6. The Wasps had an 8-2 lead going into the top of the sixth inning but they gave up three runs in the top of the sixth and one run in the top of the seventh. But the Wasps defense didn’t fold under pressure and they held off the Ghosts’ rally with great pitching and defense. Wasps’ Coach Jane Hoisington was impressed with how they performed and she said things will only get better for team going forward.

To read more on the game, pick up the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Area 4-Hers showcase skills

Talented 4-Hers from several Windham and Windsor County clubs took part in Southeast 4-H Regional Night on April 12 at Springfield High School in Springfield.

The youths, ages 8 to 18, represented the Green Mountain Teamsters 4-H Club, Pomfret; Hoof Beats of my Heart, Chester; River Riders II, Brookline; Solids, Stripes and Spots 4-H Club, Vernon; Stone Blossoms 4-H Club, South Woodstock; and Windham County Independent 4-H members.

At regional night they demonstrated skills and knowledge learned through University of Vermont (UVM) Extension 4-H projects, competing in various categories ranging from stage presentations and public speaking to posters, photographs and tabletop exhibits.

First area traveling vet

Remember the days when a doctor would make a house call whenever you got sick? That kind of doctor may seem rare today, but now veterinarians are the ones making the calls.

Abigail Fisher is a mobile veterinarian in Hanover, N.H., who does pet house calls in the Upper Valley including the Woodstock area. Mobile veterinarians are a new phenomenon, she said, but it is a fast growing field and more and more veterinarians are giving it a try.

According to Fisher, mobile vets are popular in New Hampshire and Massachusetts and in northern Vermont like the Burlington area. Fisher thinks the Upper Valley is unchartered territory, and she is ready to dive right into the area and fill an important need.

“There are no mobile vets in the area yet,” Fisher said. “There is one in Windsor but they don’t travel up here. The demand is high for a veterinarian to make house calls. I enjoy doing it.”

To learn more, read the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

EDC begins beautification efforts

Woodstock

The Economic Development Commission (EDC) is taking their first steps in revitalizing the village of Woodstock.

Last Thursday, the EDC Revitalization Subcommittee examined four possibilities that would provide immediate, yet simple, results. The subcommittee announced they would be seeking crosswalk bump outs, new benches, new flower pots, and new trash compactors to complement the bins currently being used in the town and village.

By pursuing something more tangible, Subcommittee Member Joe DiNatale said this would show the town that they are more than just a group of people talking about ideas – they are a group all about action.
“These are more visual type of items that people can see right away and they will know where the EDC money is going,” DiNatale said.

Read more about beautification efforts in the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Costly flooding in Barnard

Barnard

The town of Barnard did not escape from the flooding damages last Monday. The town sustained washouts, unpassible roads, damaged culverts and more, according to Select Board member Tim Johnson.

Johnson told the Select Board last Wednesday the town sustained up to $50,000 in road damages.  The State declared the storm a FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) event and the town will qualify for federal funding.

The roads that sustained the most damages in Barnard  included Webster Hill Road, Chateauguay Road, Lakota Road, Old School House Road, Lime Pond Road, Old Mount Hunger Road, and Fort Defiance Road.

For more on the story read the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Sports

Sophomore shines in track & field

Woodstock

Faye Stevens is only a sophomore, but the Woodstock Union High School track and field star is primed for another successful season, according to her coaches.

Last year, Stevens was one of the Wasps’ top athletes on the girls’ team. At last year’s Division III state championships, she placed in the top 15 in several events including an impressive 16th place finish in the state championship decathlon … as a freshman.

Stevens competes in five events during the track and field season — the 100-meter hurdles, 400 meters, long jump, triple jump and her favorite event, the pole vault. Although WUHS does not have a track, Stevens travels to Windsor High School and practices at its pole vault pit.

For more on track and field star Faye Stevens, read the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Woodstock softball beats Randolph

Woodstock

The Woodstock girls’ softball team won their first game of the season on Monday. The Wasps held off Randolph by a score of 8-6. The Wasps had an 8-2 lead going into the top of the sixth inning but they gave up three runs in the top of the sixth and one run in the top of the seventh. But the Wasps defense didn’t fold under pressure and they held off the Ghosts’ rally with great pitching and defense. Wasps’ Coach Jane Hoisington was impressed with how they performed and she said things will only get better for team going forward.

To read more on the game, pick up the April 25th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Features

NWPL Ex Libris Gala

On Sunday, April 28 NWPL’s Board of Trustees will kick off the library’s most important fundraiser of the year at The Woodstock Inn & Resort: the highly anticipated 18th annual Ex Libris Gala Benefit. Some tickets are still available.

The Gala will begin with a reception at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner at 6:30 p.m. The menu will feature courses specially customized by the Inn’s award-winning Chef, Rhys Lewis, as well as contributions from local provisioners including the Heart Rock Café and Vermont Farmstead Cheese.

Nearly every feature of the Gala, from its menu to its guest speaker to its original and creative table centerpieces, represents the imagination, initiative, and sheer elbow grease of the library’s volunteers. This pervasive group of multi-talented individuals touches virtually every aspect of the library — not just at Gala season, but on every day of the year.

“Volunteers are essential to the success of the Norman Williams Public Library,” said Amanda Merk, NWPL’s Executive Director. “Each day, numerous volunteers work behind the scenes to help the library thrive.”

To read more on the story, see the April 18th edition of the Vermont Standard.

Obituaries

Elizabeth (Bloxsom) Nagle

RUTLAND — Elizabeth (Bloxsom) Nagle, 89, formally of Clifton, NJ died April 20, 2019 at The Pines in Rutland after a very short illness.

Betty was born May 28, 1929, to Elizabeth (Ehrl) of South Orange, NJ and Andrew E Bloxsom of Springfield, VT.  She grew up in Nutley, NJ, graduated Nutley High School in 1947 and went on to graduate in 1951 from The Newark College of Rutgers University, where Betty majored in Sociology and minored in Psychology.  Later she attended Keane College in Union, NJ.  She married Charles D. Nagle of West Orange in 1951 and taught in the Essex County school system until moving to Clifton, NJ where, in later years, she worked for Scheidemann Realty in Clifton, NJ.

Betty was a parishioner of The Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Rutland, VT.  She also was a member of several book clubs, loved reading and any form of writing.  She was published in The Journal of the California Graduate School of Family Psychology and published two books:  The Legacy of Grace and The Live Mandala, which were her life’s passion.  She was fond of animals – cats in particular – especially her last cat, Jenny, who relocated with her from NJ to Vermont in 2001.  She enjoyed the camaraderie and treasured friendships she made while living at the Maples and was very proud of a rosary prayer group which she initiated while there.

Surviving are a daughter, Eileen (Nagle) Godfrey and her husband, James of Woodstock,VT (formerly of Killington)  and a grandson, Lucas Godfrey who is a Junior at Elon University,  in Elon NC. She also leaves behind many cherished friends.

A mass of Christian burial will be held at 11 am, Saturday June 8, 2019 in Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Rutland, VT.   A reception will follow at The Maples Dining Room, 5 General Wing Road, Rutland.

A private burial will be held in Riverside Cemetery in Killington, VT

Memorial contributions may be made to Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (www.vabvi.org)

Arrangements are by the Clifford Funeral Home.

 

Abbie Darling Paterson

Reading

Abbie Darling Paterson, 83, died following a short illness on March 25, 2019.

Abbie was born on Sept. 4, 1935 in Englewood, NJ the daughter of Henry W. O. and Grace C. (Darling) Mustermann.

She was pre deceased by her son Derek C. Barker in 1994 and her husband Robert Paterson in 2015. She is survived by her daughter Anne Darling Barker and two step daughters; Julie Paterson Hazen and Lisa Paterson.

At her request there will be no public services.

The family is being assisted by the Cabot Funeral Home in Woodstock, VT. An on line guest book can be found at cabotfh.com.

Lillian (Wark) Wuttke DeGiacomo

Cavendish, formerly Barnard, Vermont

Lillian (Wark) Wuttke DeGiacomo passed away at her home in Cavendish, VT on April 18, 2019, at the age of 101.

A native of Brooklyn, NY, Lillian grew up and attended schools in Baldwin, Long Island, NY. She graduated in 1935 and was married in 1941 to William C. Wuttke Sr., who was a Japanese P.O.W. during World War II. During the war, Lillian worked at Grumman’s airplane plant in Long Island helping produce airplanes for our servicemen. After the war, she lived on Long Island, NY, Dallastown, PA, and in Des Moines, IA, where she worked as an Administrative Assistant at Drake University. Her husband, Bill, died in 1977.

While in Des Moines, Lillian started working with ceramics and China painting. She won several awards at the Iowa State Fair and ceramic shows. She started her own porcelain business and after marrying Wallace DeGiacomo, a long-time friend and widower she moved to Barnard, VT in 1982. Lillian was proud of her Scottish heritage and was active in the Scottish Heritage organizations everywhere she lived. She was overjoyed to have the opportunity to visit Scotland and the Isle of Islay several times and meet distant relatives. Lillian loved to listen to the Scottish bagpipes and drums.

Lil and Wally operated “The Different Drummer”, their antique and gift shop in Barnard. Lillian produced porcelain figurines and reproduction China-head dolls, and was fondly known as “The Doll Lady.” Her work was on display at the Vermont State Craft Center, Windsor House, Billings Farm and Museum and several commercial establishments. She was a member of the Silver Lake Progressive Club of Barnard, the Vermont Crafts Council, the Vermont Council of the Arts and the Barnard Historical Society.

In recent years Lillian has lived with her son, Christopher, in Cavendish VT where she continued to expand her collection of antique dolls and enjoyed entertaining family and friends who came to visit.

We will always cherish the memories of the gatherings of family and friends in Cavendish celebrating her 90th, 100th and 101st birthdays. She loved her pet cats, Matilda and Fergus, who brought her much joy. Lillian often commented that of all the places she had lived, she loved Vermont the best.

Lillian is survived by her 5 sons, William C. Wuttke Jr. (Mel), Mountain House, CA, Peter M. Wuttke, Silver Springs, MD, Allen W. Wuttke (Cheryl), Overland Park, KS, G. Christopher Wuttke (Kerry), Cavendish, VT, and Keith D. Wuttke (Nancy), S. Royalton, VT and sister-in-law, Adeline (Wuttke) Jahelka. She will be lovingly remembered by her 7 grandchildren, Heather L. Wuttke; Heidi M. Wuttke; Christine Wuttke; Lindsay A. Stephenson; Laura M. Williams; Callie Wuttke and William C. Wuttke. Lillian will be forever missed by her 5 great-grandchildren: Ella Holmes; Kenneth S. Wuttke, Kaya L. Stephenson; Hunter A. Williams and Stella G. Williams.

Lillian was preceded in death by her parents, Henry and Bertha Wark, her sisters, Lydia Schoch and Mary Wainwright, her brother John Wark, her niece, Nancy Schoch and her beloved daughter, Heather Christine, and her husbands, William C. Wuttke Sr., and Wallace DeGiacomo. Today Lillian is overjoyed to be joining Heather and Bill in heaven.

Lillian will always live on and be remembered by future generations of her family thanks to the biographies of her life that she wrote and her handmade dolls and Christmas ornaments that will be passed down as family heirlooms.

Memorial donations in memory of Lillian can be made to Visiting Nurse Hospice, White River Junction VT or Springfield Humane Society, Springfield, VT, or to Silver Lake Progressive Club, Scholarship Fund, Barnard VT.

Services are being planned for a later date

Arrangements are under the direction of the Cabot Funeral Home in Woodstock, Vermont. An on line guest book can be found at cabotfh.com

Carla Lamberton Hodgdon

Bethel, VT

Carla Lamberton Hodgdon, 73, a person with deep Bethel roots died on April 20, 2019 after a lengthy and courageous battle with cancer. She leaves behind a rich lifetime of connections and memories in the community.

Born Carla Lamberton in Haverhill, New Hampshire on November 19, 1945, she graduated from Whitcomb High School in 1963 and remained in contact with a number of her classmates throughout her life. She went on to the University of Vermont and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing.

After graduating in 1967 Carla volunteered for the Peace Corps and spent two years in Honduras, eventually serving as Associate Professor at the National University of Honduras School of Nursing. When her Peace Corps stint was completed, she returned to the US., married to a man studying to become a veterinarian, and settled in Davis, California, where she was employed at the Yolo County Health Department as the nursing supervisor.

While in California, she completed a Pediatric Practitioner Program and worked at well child clinics and provided primary care at Federal migrant camps. Her first marriage ended in divorce and she returned to Bethel as a single parent in 1977. She worked for the Department of Health from 1977 through 2003,  serving as Health Care District Director from 1985 through her retirement in 2003.

Carla and David Hodgdon were married on October 13, 1984.

Even more than her profession, however, Carla made her presence felt in the community in many different ways. She is a longtime member of the Bethel Community Chorus. She served on the town Planning Commission (as secretary, 2001-2017) and provided office and phone support for the Town Manager. She served as the coordinator for the Bethel Red Cross Emergency shelter (2012-2018). She has been an active member of the Bethel Historical Society and the Vermont 251 Club, for which she served on the Board of Directors for seven years.

Carla’s artistic persona has been as active and productive as her service self. She has been an active member of the Miller Memorial United Methodist Church since 1989 where she served in numerous capacities and has been a regular member of the choir. As a visual artist, her canvases and water colors have found homes on many Bethel walls and her hex signs adorn local barns. As an accomplished needleworker she has created countless counted cross-stitches. As a gardener, she has always been generous is sharing the bounties of her perennial gardens.

In retirement, Carla and David traveled extensively on the East Coast, their itineraries defined by visits to loved ones and whichever casinos came in-between.

She was pre-deceased by her brother, R. Scott Lamberton in 2006 and grandson Colby Scott Hodgdon in 2017. She is survived by her beloved husband David of Bethel and sons Jonathan, and his wife Terri, Keith (both of Bethel), and Curtis Powers of Cape Elizabeth, Maine.  She is also survived by seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Calling hours will be held Friday, April 26, 2019 at Day Funeral Home in Randolph from 5:00 – 7:00 PM.

Carla’s life of healing, service, and art will be embraced at a celebration on June 8, to be held at her home where her perennial gardens can share in the joyful memories of a life well-lived.

Online condolences may be made at www.dayfunerals.com.  Arrangements are by the Day Funeral Home in Randolph.